WWII

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War Reporters: Martha Gellhorn

Seema Syeda appreciates the charm and chutzpah of indefatigable war correspondent Martha Gellhorn. Having crossed the Atlantic to cover her first conflict, the Spanish Civil War, Gellhorn found herself in Czechoslovakia, just before the Nazi occupation of the region known to the Germans as the Sudetenland.

German SS Troops with a Panzer Division

The Ardennes, 1944

More than 4,000 square miles of hills and ridges, thickly forested, dissected by streams and rivers, its few roads punctuated by chokepoints. One of Western Europe’s ancient wildernesses. How was the Ardennes Offensive executed, and how did it accelerate the bitter end of one of history’s most brutal regimes?

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MHM October 2019

The October issue of Military History Matters, the British military history magazine, is now on sale. To subscribe to the magazine, click here. To subscribe to the digital archive, click here. In this issue: SPECIAL: The Ardennes, 1944 The Ardennes Offensive, also known as the Battle of the Bulge, was Hitler’s last push against the Allies at the end […]

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Found: the bow of the USS Grunion

The USS Grunion was a Gato-class submarine that was sunk at Kiska, Alaska, during World War II. Operating near the Aleutian Islands, the submarine reported that it had been attacked by Japanese antisubmarine patrols, but had managed to avoid sinking. Later moving to Kiska Island, from which it was based throughout July 1942, the Grunion […]

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War Reporters: Ernie Pyle

Dubbed ‘the Soldier’s Friend’, his work had been syndicated across the States, making him a household name. President Harry Truman, on learning of Pyle’s death at the hands of a hidden Japanese machine-gunner, summed it up, saying nobody had ‘so well told the story’.

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Battle Map: Operation Cobra

Operation Cobra was a resounding success for the Allied forces on their path to liberating France in the summer of 1944, and one of the key turning-points in the history of the Second World War. Those days of fast-moving action between 25 and 30 July saw the beginning of the final collapse of the German occupation of France.

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War Reporters: George Orwell

The life of a journalist who was never far from the front-line: George Orwell. His writing sought to rationalise and navigate the challenges of the day, and his early vision for a utopian socialist society slowly gave way to the dystopian warnings expressed in his novels.

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Operation Market Garden

The world’s largest ever airborne operation was launched during September 1944, with less than a week of planning. This was one of many ingredients in what, for the Allies, would become a major strategic setback. What went wrong?

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After D-Day: the Normandy breakout, 1944

Blockbuster movies have been made about the legendary D-Day landings, but little attention is paid to what happened afterwards. Although the Allies succeeded in puncturing the German Atlantic Wall, a long campaign of bitter fighting through the fields and hedgerows of the Normandy countryside –otherwise known as the bocage – lay ahead. How were the Germans brought to final defeat?

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