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Sino-Japanese War

How dangerous is North Korea?

Neil Faulkner assesses the latest Korean crisis in the light of the peninsula’s troubled history. The death of North Korean dictator Kim Jong-il has put the erratic and secretive regime in Pyongyang back under the international spotlight. The great powers with an interest in the Korean peninsula – China, Russia, Japan, and the US – […]

British Soldier in Afghanistan

Defending the Forces

Mark Corby got it wrong about modern British Army performance, argues paratrooper Tom Blakey. With over 23 years’ service, I have served on operations in Northern Ireland, Kosovo, Macedonia, Iraq, and Afghanistan (multiple tours of each, except for the Balkans operations). After reading Mark Corby’s Opinion piece ‘Falling Standards’ in MT 13, I was left […]

Captured Indian mutineers being strapped to cannon.

Barbarism in War

What makes modern wars so barbaric, asks Military Times Editor Neil Faulkner. All forms of warfare can produce atrocities. The survival instinct and a need for split-second judgement about perceived threat can cause soldiers to shoot rather than seek to capture an opponent. Fear can turn into anger in the heat of combat, and battle frenzy cause […]

Combined Joint Training Field Exercise (CJTFEX) 96

Falling Standards

Mark Corby laments the degraded condition of the British Army. As a direct result of the Iraq and Afghan insurgencies, it appears that all is not well with the British Army. Firstly, the frankly mawkish attitude to casualties has shocked earlier generations. Whilst every casualty is a personal tragedy for those involved, 378 dead in […]

Barbarossa and Oil

Barbarossa and Oil

Philip Andrews responds to Mark Corby’s analysis of the failure of Operation Barbarossa in MT 9.  The failure of Barbarossa is really quite straightforward: in the end, it all depended on petroleum. Moscow was not important to Stalin. He was quite prepared, and had indeed planned, to retreat with as much industry as possible behind the Urals, […]

13th Royal Horse Artillery in Kiel, May 1945.

The Desert Rats in Libya

With a new war raging in Libya, Second World War veteran Patrick Delaforce teases out the lessons of the 1940-1943 campaign in the Western Desert. Shortly after the outbreak of the Second World War, when Winston Churchill had a seat in the War cabinet, he wrote: ‘Should Italy become hostile, our first battlefield must be […]

Desert Rats

The Desert Rats in Libya

With a new war raging in Libya, Second World War veteran Patrick Delaforce teases out the lessons of the 1940-1943 campaign in the Western Desert. Shortly after the outbreak of the Second World War, when Winston Churchill had a seat in the War Cabinet, he wrote: ‘Should Italy become hostile, our first battlefield must be […]

Monarchs & Fighting Men - prt gallery small

Who started the First World War?

Nigel Jones and Neil Faulkner take opposing sides in the long-ranging and recently re-energised debate over who was responsible for the outbreak of the Great War. POINT Germany is guilty as charged, says historian and regular MT contributor Nigel Jones The First World War killed around ten million combatants and as many civilians. It led directly to […]

Victorian redcoats - opinion

Egypt in war and revolution

The potential of the Egyptian Revolution of 2011 cannot be underestimated. Egypt has been the political centre of gravity of the Middle East since the Arab conquests of the 7th century AD. Again and again throughout history, it is Egypt that has led the rest of the Middle East. When Saladin united Egypt and Syria under […]

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