The April issue of Military History Matters, the British military history magazine, is now on sale.

To subscribe to the magazine, click here. To subscribe to the digital archive, click here.

In this issue:

Front cover of Military History Matters 115, the April 2020 issue.
Front cover of Military History Matters 115, the April 2020 issue.

ON THE COVER:
Balaklava in perspective

The Charge of the Light Brigade is a military myth. It happened, of course, but it has become embedded in a false narrative framework. The Battle of Balaklava as a whole – little more, in reality, than three disjointed skirmishes – has been inflated in popular culture out of all proportion to its real significance. In our special, Patrick Mercer analyses Balaklava afresh, to place it in its wider context, and to review the events on the battlefield on the basis of his own knowledge of the ground.

Dutch courage and cowardice: traitors and patriots

Ken Wright and Anne Gafiuk on collaboration and resistance in the Nazi-occupied Netherlands.

Turning the tide: The Battle of Ayn Jalut

William E. Welsh on the Mamluks who stopped the Mongol surge.

A revolution in conflict: trench warfare, 1916-1918

Neil Faulkner on how the stalemate along the Western Front was broken.

Sideshow: Frederick Russell Burnham

‘The Well-Travelled Cowboy-Adventure’.

Also in this issue:

Christopher Warner’s new series on War Athletes, Behind the Image, War Culture, Book Reviews, Museum Review, Back to the Drawing Board, Listings, and more.

To subscribe to the magazine, click here. To subscribe to the digital archive, click here.


From the editor

 MHM editor Neil Faulkner
MHM editor Neil Faulkner

Balaklava is one of the most-famous battles in British history. It stands alongside Hastings, Blenheim, Trafalgar, Waterloo, the Somme, the Battle of Britain, and El Alamein in that regard.

Yet it cannot really be compared with any of these – all of which were large-scale struggles with great issues at stake. Balaklava was little more than three skirmishes on the flank of a British expeditionary force that had been landed – for no very good reason – on the remote Crimean peninsula.

In our special this time, Patrick Mercer – a Crimean War specialist who has walked the ground many times – picks apart some of the myths and puts Balaklava in its proper perspective.

Ayn Jalut, on the other hand, a battle between Mongols and Mamluks in AD 1260, was by any account decisive – as William Welsh explains – for it largely determined the fate of the medieval Middle East.

Also in this issue, we have an investigation of the perilous struggle between ‘patriots and traitors’ in the Nazi-occupied Netherlands; the second part of our analysis of First World War trench fighting, focusing on post-1916 infantry tactics; and a ‘Sideshow’ feature that reviews the extraordinary career of Frederick Russell Burnham, one of the most-renowned military scouts of the late 19th century.


To subscribe to the magazine, click here. To subscribe to the digital archive, click here.



Leave a Reply