Author: Seema Syeda

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War Reporters: Bennet Burleigh

At the time of his death in 1914, Bennet Burleigh was quite possibly the most famous war correspondent in the world. The Daily Telegraph, the paper for which he had spent a large part of his career reporting, published a full-page obituary chronicling his adventures – which ended up being several thousand words longer than the paper’s coverage of the death of Tennyson.

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War Reporters: Martha Gellhorn

Seema Syeda appreciates the charm and chutzpah of indefatigable war correspondent Martha Gellhorn. Having crossed the Atlantic to cover her first conflict, the Spanish Civil War, Gellhorn found herself in Czechoslovakia, just before the Nazi occupation of the region known to the Germans as the Sudetenland.

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Iron Age hillfort in danger of erosion

Archaeologists are working to uncover the secrets of a Roman hillfort near Caernarfon in north Wales. The coastal fort is believed to date back about 2,500 years, but is in danger of being totally eroded by the sea.

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Found: the bow of the USS Grunion

The USS Grunion was a Gato-class submarine that was sunk at Kiska, Alaska, during World War II. Operating near the Aleutian Islands, the submarine reported that it had been attacked by Japanese antisubmarine patrols, but had managed to avoid sinking. Later moving to Kiska Island, from which it was based throughout July 1942, the Grunion […]

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Churchill’s wartime visitor book available online

To commemorate the 80th anniversary of Churchill War Rooms becoming operational, Imperial War Museums has digitised the original visitor book containing the names of numerous well-known visitors, including King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, General Dwight D Eisenhower, Winston Churchill himself, and Clement Attlee.

The Bersted warrior’s helmet

Remains of Iron Age warrior to go on display

The spectacular remains of an Iron Age warrior, discovered 12 years ago in Chichester, England, will soon be put on public display for the first time at the Novium Museum, Chichester. Thought to date from 50BC, the warrior’s skeleton was discovered buried alongside a series of ornate weapons and artefacts.

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The Seven Days, 1862

The American Civil War might easily have ended in 1862. In the event, it dragged on for three more years, claiming the lives of 600,000 men, more than all of America’s other wars combined. A strong case can be made that this outcome was the work of two very different men – George B McClellan and Robert E Lee. To what extent do individuals change the course of history?

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