18th Century

The_Battle_of_Culloden_featured

What really happened at the Battle of Culloden?

  Culloden has been frequently presented as a battle fought by an incompetent, ill-equipped, and badly led Jacobite army wielding swords against superior, professional Redcoats armed with muskets. A new book by Murray Pittock, Bradley Professor of History at the University of Glasgow, challenges this consensus. Murray shows that Government forces actually won the battle by blade, while the Jacobites, though few in number, were professionally managed and […]

Nader_featured

BRIEFING ROOM: Nader Shah

Look at that bling – who was he? Hailed by historians as ‘a second Alexander’ and ‘the Napoleon of the East’, Nader Shah was Shah (monarch) of Persia from 1736 to 1747. He was a gifted military commander and used his prowess to build a huge empire that included Iran, Afghanistan, the North Caucasus, northern India, and much of central […]

Culloden_featured

After Culloden: from rebels to Redcoats

Robbie MacNiven explores the fate of the Scots who survived Culloden. On a bitterly cold April afternoon in 1746, on moorland just east of the town of Inverness, the power of Scotland’s Highland clans was forever broken. The Battle of Culloden Moor marked not just the final defeat of Charles Edward Stuart and his Jacobite […]

North America and Quebec

The Battle of Quebec, 13 September 1759

James Wolfes’ victory at Quebec gave the British dominion over North American. It was the victory of an army forced to adapt fast to the demands of colonial warfare  in the wilderness The Battle of Quebec on 13 September 1759, below, showing the deployment of the British (shown in red) and French forces (shown in […]

Plan-of-Dettingen

The Battle of Fontenoy, 11 May 1745

The War of the Austrian Succession found the British Army run down and neglected, its proud military traditions grown sclerotic. Yet in May 1745, at Fontenoy in Belgium, 15000 British redcoats mounted a doomed assault every bit as courageous as Pickett’s charge at Gettysburg The ‘mousetrap’: the Battle of Dettingen, 27 June 1743. George II […]

Plan of Blenheim

The Battle of Blenheim, 13 August 1704

The British Army emerged from the crisis of revolution and civil war that had given it birth with a distinctive military doctrine based on movement, firepower, and aggression. But realising its potential required a master of war in the Army’s own image. Below: The Storming of the Schellenberg, 2 July 1704. The weight and determination […]