British Empire

Jane-Austen

Jane Austen: a wartime writer?

War and violence are the last things one would associate with that 19th-century doyenne of English literature, Jane Austen. Ambles in the countryside, flirtatious glances, frocks with lace and frills, and the relentless pursuit of wealthy bachelors are the more likely images conjured by her name.

Yet conventional interpretations of the novelist’s work lack reference to a crucial context – that of war. For most of Jane Austen’s life, Britain was involved in conflicts of varying existential significance across the globe.

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Chakdara: the other Rorke’s Drift?

The epic defence of Chakdara is intriguing. It lasted a week (26 July-2 August 1897), involved 240 men defending an isolated post against up to 8,000 tribal warriors, and had a big impact on the British public back home at the time. But no VCs were awarded, and the action is almost totally forgotten today. Why?

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MHM 91 – April 2018

The April issue of Military History Monthly, the British military history magazine, is now on sale. In this issue: ON THE COVER: BIRTH OF THE RAF 100 years after its birth, renowned military historian Jeremy Black revisits the creation of a revolutionary military organisation: the Royal Air Force. SPECIAL: CHAKDARA, 1897 –  THE OTHER RORKE’S DRIFT? In an […]

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