Articles

Bennet

War Reporters: Bennet Burleigh

At the time of his death in 1914, Bennet Burleigh was quite possibly the most famous war correspondent in the world. The Daily Telegraph, the paper for which he had spent a large part of his career reporting, published a full-page obituary chronicling his adventures – which ended up being several thousand words longer than the paper’s coverage of the death of Tennyson.

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Tank museum appeals for gun information

Guns are an everyday feature of most military museums, but one weapon in particular has attracted a lot of attention. A WWI German Luger was recently handed in to the police in Wiltshire. Now the nearby Tank Museum is appealing for information about the pistol’s history.

Jourdan at Battle of Fleurus

MHM Caption Competition: February 2020 — Winners Announced!

We asked you to think of something appropriately witty for this image taken from our article on the Battle of Fleurus, featured in the February issue of Military History Matters. Here are the winners: WINNER: “Right, nobody move! Ok, you can start painting now.” — Arthur Rawkins RUNNERS-UP: “Geoff’s stag do rapidly got out of […]

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Collaboration under way to recover missing WWII casualties

The victims of World War II are remembered in regular commemorations, but many of the fatalities have never been recovered. Now academics at Bedford’s Cranfield Forensic Institute (CFI) are collaborating with the US Department of Defense in a new initiative to recover and identify those who remain missing.

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REVIEW – Waiting for War: Britain, 1939 – 1940

Most Britons are proud of their country’s role in helping to bring about victory in the Second World War. There is nothing to be proud of, however, in the way the government and its agencies ran the first nine months of war, from September 1939 to May 1940 – the period known as ‘the Phoney War’.

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The YB-40 Gunship

When the USAAF’s Eighth Air Force arrived in Britain in mid-1942, it was confident that unescorted formations of B-17 Flying Fortresses could make precision daylight bombing raids without suffering serious losses.

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REVIEW – The Irish Civil War: law, execution, and atrocity

Imagine this scene: soldiers bring out the body parts of executed men and place them outside their barracks; their loved ones arrive bringing coffins on carts and begin identifying the body parts and placing them in the coffins; all the while a military band plays dance music.

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War on Film: 1917 reviewed

Just when you thought there was nothing else to say about the First World War after four years of commemorations, along comes 1917 – a hugely imaginative, totally immersive story set on the Western Front.

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