Articles

Cover_1000

MHM February 2019

The February issue of Military History Matters, the British military history magazine, is now on sale. To subscribe to the magazine, click here. To subscribe to the digital archive, click here. In this issue: Geronimo: the Apache guerrilla In our cover feature, David Norris charts the extraordinary resistance of a Native American war-leader who was eventually outnumbered 400 to one. […]

19710261-0481_Lumbermen-Amongst-the-Pines

MHM February Caption Competition – Winners Announced!

Last month, we asked you to think of something appropriately witty for this image from our feature on Alfred Munnings, published in the February issue of Military History Matters. We are delighted to announce the winners. WINNER ‘This incident was definitely worth logging.’ — William Arthurs RUNNERS UP ‘There’s simply no trace of where that tank went […]

Platrand Thumbnail 2

The Siege of Ladysmith: a video tour

The siege of Ladysmith during the Anglo-Boer war is the stuff of legends. The Boers had surrounded General Sir George White and his troops since the start of November 1899, but they had been generally inactive and unwilling to launch a frontal assault on the town. That changed on 6 January 1900, when the biggest engagement […]

Webp.net-resizeimage

War Requiem

Dan Keane reviews Benjamin Britten’s War Requiem, a key highlight of the London Coliseum’s 2018/2019 season. It is difficult for any artist to find an appropriate medium to convey the immensity of pain generated by war. Such is the task of Benjamin Britten’s War Requiem, first performed in 1962 to mark the consecration of the […]

A7-Churchill-inspecting-naval-cadets

MHM January Caption Competition

Think of something appropriately witty for this image from our feature on Churchill at the Admiralty, published in the January issue of Military History Matters. Leave your caption as a comment below. The best caption will be judged by the editorial team and published online! Winners will be announced in early February.  

AKG5821267Red-(1)

The Long World War

The crisis engendered by the Treaty of Versailles broke the European liberal centre and led to polarisation to both left and right. An apocalyptic confrontation between socialist revolution and fascist reaction dominated European politics during the 1930s. The victory of the latter across most of Europe set the stage for another world war, even longer, bloodier, and more barbaric than the first.

Comp

[Competition Closed] MHM January Quiz – win a model B-24 Liberator

One lucky winner will receive a model B-24 Liberator, courtesy of Corgi. Often unfairly overshadowed by both the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress and the later B-29 Superfortress, the Consolidated B-24 Liberator was the third of America’s heavy bombers used during WWII, and has the distinction of being the most heavily produced four-engined bomber in aviation history. This 1:72 scale die-cast model aircraft is a based […]

BookAwards_Matters

MHM Book of the Year 2019: Shortlist

MHM has curated a list of 2018’s best military history titles: the nominees for this year’s MHM book awards. Our selection includes some of the best-researched, most-insightful, and most-readable titles reviewed in the magazine over the last year. But we need your help to select the winners! The shortlist of 12 books can be found below. Voting […]

German-troops-in-retreat,-1918

The Hundred Days Offensive: did the British win it for the Allies?

While admitting that Haig was no genius, revisionist historians have argued that by 1918, he was able to co-ordinate successfully all elements of military force – artillery, armour, airpower, and infantry – to achieve a decisive victory in the series of operations known collectively as ‘The Hundred Days’. Does this argument stand up to critique? Chris Bambery tests the case.

< 1 2 3 4 5 >»

Advertisement