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Great Explosions! 1500-1945

Since the 15th century, conventional explosives have been used in ever-increasing quantities against key targets. David Porter traces some of the most spectacular episodes in war on land, air, and sea.

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Stamford Bridge: the last Anglo-Saxon victory

The Battle of Hastings in 1066 was not only a seminal event in British history, it is also widely regarded as a turning point in military history: the moment when a ‘Dark Age’ way of war based on heavy infantry gave way to a ‘medieval’ way of war based on armoured cavalry. But was this really so? Shift the focus from Hastings, and events take on a new aspect.

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MHM October Caption Competition – Winners announced!

Last month, we asked you to think of something appropriately witty for this image from our feature on the Battle of Tunis, 1943, published in the October issue of Military History Monthly. We are delighted to announce the winners. WINNER ‘Unfortunately for those down below, the Field Marshal had decided to go Half Monty that day.’ – […]

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MHM October Quiz – win a historic warbirds calendar!

Three lucky readers have the chance to win a Historic Warbirds calendar, published by Workman. Battles that altered the course of history. Missions that made servicemen into heroes. Aircraft that brought the Allies to victory. From the renowned military experts at Osprey Publishing, an awe-inspiring and ingeniously designed new calendar explores military aircraft from 1939 to […]

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Square Rounds: Review

Teddy Cutler reflects on the magic and madness of the First World War in a review of Square Rounds, now showing at Finborough Theatre, London. Throughout the second act of Square Rounds, Tony Harrison’s play that was first staged at the National Theatre in October 1992, the characters speak, and sometimes sing, a curious refrain. […]

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Battle Royal: Prince George, Duke of Kent

Patrick Boniface on the deaths in combat of regal warriors.   The door clicked shut behind him. HRH The Duke of Kent had left the warmth and comfort of his family home in Buckinghamshire. From within, his wife Princess Marina of Greece and his three young children, Edward, Alexandra, and Michael, all watched as he […]

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RAF Museum London: into the future

Seema Syeda reviews the newly remodelled RAF Museum. Museums, I thought in a rather prosaic way as I sat underneath the bomb bay of an Avro Vulcan B2 in the RAF Museum’s Hangar 5, usually chronicle the events of the past. Meandering through the corridors of the British Museum, for instance, gazing at the ossified warriors […]

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Revolutionising naval warfare in the Dutch Golden Age

How did Michiel de Ruyter transform war at sea? Gone were the chaotic close-quarter mêlées, galleys, and archers. In came tight discipline, strategic formations, and the man–o’–war. We revisit the swashbuckling era of 17th-century naval conflict, when the Dutch – not the British – ruled the waves.

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Women at War: Simone de Beauvoir

Born in Paris in 1908, Simone de Beauvoir belonged to that unlucky generation which lived through both World Wars. She was also one of the 20th century’s seminal thinkers.

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WWI: Pershing on the Western Front

No general in American history held the kind of absolute power General Pershing wielded. With complete backing from President Woodrow Wilson and Secretary of War Newton D Baker, Pershing could shape the American Expeditionary Force, due to deploy on the Western Front of the First World War, as he saw fit. But how successful was his military strategy?

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