The best military history events, lectures, and exhibitions.


Exhibition:Royal-Academy-of-Music

WAR MUSIC: NOTES FROM THE FIRST WORLD WAR

In the First World War music was heard on the battlefield, in concert halls, in the camps and in churches. Music reflected and affected all the emotions of war with everything from requiems to rousing choruses. Marking the First World War centenary, this exhibition takes a broad look at the relationship between music and war against the background of radical musical change. Objects on display include a wind-up trench gramophone, a tenor horn camouflaged with black paint to stop it glinting at the enemy, a burnt-out harmonica and soldiers’ song-books. You can also view original film footage of musical episodes amid the conflict, featuring British, German, French and Chinese musicians. ‘War Music’ also explores the Academy’s own story during the War: discover how students and alumni fared once they’d enlisted and left London far behind.

Details:
Until 31 October 2015
Royal Academy of Music Museum, Marylebone Road, London, NW1 5HT
www.ram.ac.uk/war-music
020 7873 7443


Exhibition:

THE WELLINGTON TRUSTWellington-Trust

The Wellington Trust is continuing with its exhibition to help inform and educate on the role of hospital and troop Ships in WWI. The war was world wide, although many people only seem aware of the horrors of the Western front. Without these Merchant ships, mostly taken up from trade by the Government, we could not have fought the war, let alone returned all those who
were wounded back to their homeland, be that in Britain, India , ANZ, or elsewhere. 1/7th of the Allied troops in France came from India, 140,000 labourers were transported from China to dig trenches, carry ammunition, recover bodies from No-Mans-Land etc. In addition to the British troops going to France, Gallipoli, and Mesopotamia, there were millions of horses to be shipped. Nine hospital ships were sunk by mine or torpedo. This spring we especially commemorate the role of the troop and hospital ships in the Gallipoli Campaign, which was the first major joint amphibious landing undertaken by the British, French, and ANZAC Armies. There were no field hospitals and all the wounded had to be evacuated to a hospital ship. Visit our free exhibition to learn more or help with your research.

Details:
Sundays and Mondays 1 March until 1 June. 11am-5pm
HQS Wellington, Temple Stairs, Victoria Embankment, London, WC2R 2PN
www.thewellingtontrust.com
020 7836 8179


Exhibition:

LAST POST: REMEMBERING THE FIRST WORLD WAR

PostalIn partnership with Ironbridge Gorge Museums Trust, Last Post: Remembering the First World War reveals the impact the postal service played in communications, morale and social change through personal stories and fascinating objects.

Details:
Open until 27 March 2015
Coalbrookdale Museum of Iron, Shropshire
www.postalheritage.org.uk
020 7354 7287


Exhibition:

WATERWAYS ON THE WESTERN FRONT

London Canal MuseumWaterways on the Western Front shows how the canals of Belgium saved millions from starving while in France they brought tens of thousands of wounded to safety. It explains how a tug boat owner stopped the Germans taking Dunkirk. It reveals the secret munitions port at Richborough, Kent – built in six months – which launched seagoing barges to supply the Ypres salient. It is also an opportunity to remember those who lost their lives crossing the canals in the war’s decisive battles.

Details:
Until 12 April 2015
London Canal Museum, 12-13 New Wharf Road, London N1 9RT
www.canalmuseum.org.uk/whatson/index.html
07425136142
Free entry to the exhibition only on the first Thursday of every month from 3.40 p.m. till 7.00 p.m

Image – Imperial War Museum

Exhibition:

TATE MODERN – CONFLICT, TIME, PHOTOGRAPHY

Tate ModernConflict, Time, Photography traces diverse and poignant journeys through 150 years of conflict around the world since the invention of photography. In this moving exhibition at Tate Modern, the works are ordered according to how long after the event they were created from moments, days and weeks to decades later. Photographs taken seven months after the fire bombing of Dresden are shown alongside those taken seven months after the end of the First Gulf War. The result is the chance to make new connections while viewing the legacy of war as artists and photographers have captured it in retrospect. Tickets on sale now.

Details:
Until 15 March 2015
Tate Modern, Bankside, London, SE1 9TG
www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/conflict-time-photography
020 7887 8888


 



Leave a Reply