The June issue of Military History Monthly, the British military history magazine, is on sale today.

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In the latest issue we cover:

Bannockburn – Scotland’s crucial victory
As we draw closer to the referendum over Scotland’s independence, and to the 700th anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn, MHM explores the Anglo-Scottish Wars with an extended, in-depth study of England and Scotland’s epochal clash.

Revanchist Republic – France prepares for war
MHM Editor Neil Faulkner looks at the military and political position of France on the eve of the Great War.

Siege-Master – Vauban and France’s ‘Fatal Avenue’
David Flintham studies the shining career of the military-engineering genius, and his role in the defence of France during the reign of Louis XIV.

Cracking Cassino – The Anzio Beachhead
Concluding his comprehensive study of the Cassino Campaign, Patrick Mercer delivers an account of the calamitous Anzio landings of 70 years ago.

Also in this issue: Behind the Image, Thinkers at War, War Culture,  Book of the Month, War on Film, Museum Review, Book Reviews, Competition, and much more.


From the editor

Neil Faulkner, Editor

This year the Scots are voting on independence. Seven hundred years ago, they had to fight for it. We mark the anniversary of Scotland’s greatest battle – Bannockburn – by making it the subject of a new style of in-depth feature. As well as telling the story of the battle, we look at the leaders, the soldiers, the tactics, and the historical background.

Why did the Scots win? They were heavily outnumbered and most were peasants. They were up against the cream of English chivalry, backed by legions of longbowmen and armoured foot.

Bannockburn was one of a series of battles that ended the brief supremacy of feudal heavy horse on European battlefields. The Medieval economy was growing and enriching a new class of ‘middling sort’ – artisans, traders, and yeomen. From their ranks, new formations of disciplined infantry were recruited.

Victory went to commanders who grasped the potential of the new infantry and the value of combined-arms tactics. Robert Bruce was one of them.

Also this issue, David Flintham returns with an assessment of the great French fortification-builder Vauban, Patrick Mercer completes his series on the epic battles for Cassino in early 1944, and we analyse the position of France on the eve of WWI.

Finally, you may notice something different about this issue of MHM. Page size is 10% bigger to allow for better presentation, and page layout has been redesigned to make content clearer, images larger, and different sections of the magazine easier to navigate. We hope you like the new look!

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